Traders can have say on parking zone proposals at meeting with Mayor

May 18 2013

Local traders have been invited to have their say on plans for residents' parking schemes at a meeting with Mayor George Ferguson next week.

Traders invited to have say on parking zone proposals at meeting with Mayor

Local traders have been invited to have their say on plans for residents' parking schemes at a meeting with Mayor George Ferguson next week.
The event, specifically for businesses, will also be attended by Business West managing director Phil Smith.
It will be held at City Hall on Wednesday, May 22, from 5-7pm and anyone wanting to attend must register and book for this event via Eventbrite: http://rpsbusinessevent.eventbrite.co.uk/

It follows a forum last week, hosted by the Cotham, Bishopston and Redland Neighbourhood Partnership, which brought residents and traders face to face with the Mayor, who was guest speaker at the event.

He spoke on his hopes to give greater powers to neighbourhood partnerships, about setting ambitious targets for energy usage and tackling waste and about making the city a "laboratory for change".
But it was his proposal to create 18 new parking zones in the city that proved the hottest topic of the day.
During a question-and answer session, people attending the meeting at Horfield Baptist Church on Saturday, May 11, raised queries such as why the scheme had to extend as far from the city centre as Bishopston, and raised concerns about the level of public consultation and the effect on shopping areas, such as Gloucester Road, if people found they could no longer park there.
Mr Ferguson said the schemes were not "one size fits all" but while he was prepared to discuss issues such as zone boundaries and parking provision for non-residents such as two- or three-hour parking bays, the principle of the scheme was "not up for grabs".
Mr Ferguson said: "I am willing to flex the system according to local circumstances but I shall not drop the principle. What I will do is vary it to the local circumstances. I said from the beginning that I regard the business case and support of the high streets as vitally important."
He said during his speech that Bristol was not succeeding in improving air quality with more cars on the city's roads and said there had to be "an element of not just carrot but also stick" to reduce traffic.  
He said: "You can't get a better bus system where roads are clogged with cars - I've got to be brave about it."
Traders in Bishopston and Redland have spoken to Bishopstonvoice about their concerns for the future of their businesses if residents-only parking zones are introduced on the surrounding streets. Posters have appeared in a number of shops along Gloucester Road branding the scheme "highway robbery".
Carrie Mullan, of Gloucester Road business Artemis, was among a number of traders at the meeting and told Bishopstonvoice: "200 years of heritage will be wiped out within a couple of years. How can we struggle through this economic climate, hoping for the future, when they are hitting us down right at the wrong moment?"

  • Councillors are set to discuss the residents' parking zones at an extroadinary meeting of the Sustainable Development and Transport Scrutiny Commission on Tuesday, May 28, at 6pm. Anyone who wishes to speak at the meeting should email democratic.services@bristol.gov.uk by noon on Friday, May 24.
  • The following evening on Wednesday, May 29, there will be a Cabinet meeting from 4pm, where the Mayor is expected to make a formal decision on whether to go ahead with the parking zones proposals and begin public consultations on the schemes. More information will available closer to the date of the meeting. Anyone who wishes to address the Cabinet meeting can email democratic.services@bristol.gov.uk by Friday, May 24.