‘Too tall’ fears over cricket floodlights

September 02 2014

OVER two-thirds of people who attended the recent drop-in sessions at Gloucestershire County Cricket Club are in support of the club's plans for floodlighting, feedback has revealed.

OVER two-thirds of people who attended the recent drop-in sessions at Gloucestershire County Cricket Club are in support of the club's plans for floodlighting, feedback has revealed.
However, concerns have been raised by residents about the proposed height of the floodlights, which will be 45 metres, and the time that lights will be switched off in the evening.
The club - which plans to erect six floodlighting columns - has proposed to dim lights at 11pm, and turn them off at 11.45pm. The lights will be used up to 15 times during a season, which runs from April to September.
The club says that they will re-look at the hours of use, but the height of the columns is "unlikely to change".
Sixty-seven residents attended the drop-in sessions, which were held over three days in July, with 25 filling out feedback forms.
According to the cricket club, two-thirds of those who filled out the form said that having floodlighting would benefit the city, with 64 percent supporting the cricket club's plans.
The club also said that all of those who filled out the form found out everything they needed to know.
Concerns raised at the drop-in sessions also included traffic congestion on match days and anti-social behaviour.
The club says that they will be speaking with stewards, police and the council to ensure these issues are managed.
The club has also met with the Gloucester Road Traders Association to discuss how they can engage with local businesses.
Out of the 18 people who approved of the floodlighting, 100 percent thought that the floodlights would be a good way of generating more international interest in Bristol, and improving local interest in sport. Fifteen thought it would be good for increasing tourism to the area.
A spokesperson from HowZat? - the campaign group set up to challenge and revise the club's expansion plans - said: "Residents are particularly concerned about the height of the floodlights, which will be over twice as high as the flats and will dominate the surrounding area, as well as the frequency and hours of use.
"People are worried that the floodlights will enable more frequent late night matches resulting in noise, nuisance and anti-social behaviour when crowds disgorge into the surrounding residential area late at night.
"GCCC now apparently want to be able to have the lights fully on until 11 pm - rather than the 10pm deadline first suggested - and then dimmed, but not finally switched off until 11.45 pm. Such a proposal is likely to prove extremely controversial."

CGI of cricket ground with proposed floodlights