School achieves outstanding results

January 30 2014

COLSTON'S Girls' School is celebrating after Government figures revealed it was one of the highest-performing state schools in the country in last summer's GCSE exams.

COLSTON'S Girls' School is celebrating after Government figures revealed it was one of the highest-performing state schools in the country in last summer's GCSE exams.
The year group that sat the exams in 2013 was the first to join the school in Cheltenham Road since it left the independent sector and became an academy.
Ninety one per cent of girls achieved at least five A*-C passes including English and maths. The Bristol average was 52.3 per cent.
Head of school Alistair Perry said: “These results place Colston’s Girls’ School as one of the best schools in the country. They are testament to many things, not least the ambition and dedication of the students who worked so hard to achieve their potential. The results are particularly significant for the school as they represent the outcomes for our first academy intake – a truly comprehensive group of students drawn from all sections of the community and the full range of abilities.
“At a time when much is being done to encourage young women to hold the very highest aspirations, the learning community at CGS exemplifies the true potential of girls working individually and collectively to establish themselves as outstanding students and future leaders in their fields.
“ These results also prove that academic success can live alongside an education which encourages reflective and independent thinking, nurtures talent in sport and the arts, and where success is truly celebrated.”
Redland Green School was the second best state school in Bristol, with 87 per cent of students gaining five or more A*-C passes.
The figure for Fairfield High School was 50 per cent and for Orchard School Bristol 44 per cent.
The Department for Education published the results last month as part of a wealth of data to help people find out about education in their area. Information is also published for independent schools.
As families of 11-year-olds await March 1, when they find out their allocation of secondary places for September, the advice from experts remains to look at all the facts, not just the headline figures, and to visit schools before making any decisions.