January 2017 Primal Posture: Sit up and watch a movie

December 20 2016

This delightful early 20th century Christmas illustration captures the relaxed, upright sitting that all young children instinctively adopt – it’s their birthright the world over.

This delightful early 20th century Christmas illustration captures the relaxed, upright sitting that all young children instinctively adopt – it’s their birthright the world over. 

You can easily spot its characteristics:

• A straight, relaxed and ‘stacked’ spine – neither slumped forward nor arched back

• A ‘behind’ that likes to stay behind the body – not underneath it

• An ‘anteverted’ pelvis that rests on the front of the sitting bones – not the tail bones

• Shoulders that rest back even while the arms go forward

• A neck that remains tall and rested back - even while rotating the head

• Hips, legs and feet which all track outwards – pony or no pony!

If you take up a New Year activity, such as horse riding, dancing, fencing, rowing, nordic walking or running, you may find an instructor guiding you in your posture. Such traditional activities tend to advocate the postural form that children naturally have and which previous generations took for granted in adult life. However, for today’s participants, having to relearn good habits can be a significant challenge! 

Esther Gokhale’s book “8 Steps to a Pain-Free Back” is an inspirational account of natural movement and posture. It is both a self-help guide, and the textbook for the Gokhale Method Foundation Course. It will also help you to avoid any techniques or fitness approaches which may actually place unhealthy stresses on your body. For example, some contemporary modes of exercise advocate a tucking under of the tail and pelvis, which can be especially challenging to our lowest discs, lower back ligaments, and cause tight hamstrings and psoas muscles. Instead, give yourself the confidence to support and improve your natural structure in everything you do.

Whether your plans for 2017  involve taking up a new activity, and/or resolving your lingering back or joint pain, the Gokhale Method can help. Find out about our Foundation Course or sign up for a Free Workshop in Bristol at: www.gokhalemethod.com or call 0117 9422262 to speak to Clare Chapman.