History remembered as new Bishopston homes opened

August 06 2013

A plaque marking the site of what was once a shop owned by a Bristol furniture maker and benefactor of the City Museum has been unveiled at a new development on Gloucester Road.

A plaque marking the site of what was once a shop owned by a Bristol furniture maker and benefactor of the City Museum has been unveiled at a new development on Gloucester Road. Stone Hodges plaque

The homes on Pigsty Hill, next to the One in Eight charity shop,  have been named Stone Hodges in honour of the site’s former occupier and residents, city councillors and the team behind the development gathered at a ceremony on Friday, July 26.

The name was put forward by Bishopston resident Glyn Duggan, who had been researching Joseph Stone Hodges, his furniture business based on Gloucester Road from 1903 to the 1970s and the large collection of ceramics Joseph and his wife donated to the city’s museum.

Mr Duggan: “This was something I felt was very much worth doing, not just because of the local connection but because of their status as generous benefactors of the city.”

The Stone Hodges development has been opened by housing association United Communities, formerly Bristol Community Housing Foundation and United Housing Association. It offers 24 homes with a mix of rental and shared-ownership affordable housing, all of which will soon be occupied.

Assistant Mayor with responsibility for transport, planning, strategic housing and regeneration, Councillor Mark Bradshaw, revealed the silver plaque which will be displayed on the new buildings. Stone Hodges plaque

He said: “We have a proud history in Bristol and lots of local crafts and enterprises and it’s important that you are keeping that alive on this site.”

Mr Bradshaw praised the team for the work that went into transforming the site into affordable housing. Referring to the 15,000 people currently on housing waiting lists in the city, he said: “There are lots of sites in the city which are waiting, but are stuck for various reasons, and I want those to be developed to create the homes that the city needs.”

The site was designed by Oxford Architects and built by Halsall Construction.

Bishopston councillor David Willingham, who attended the ceremony, said he was pleased to see the area brought back into use. He said: “This has regenerated derelict buildings and by turning this site into housing, it is putting people into homes with good transport links and close to employment opportunities.”