Have a say on planned new ward boundaries

December 22 2014

SIGNIFICANT changes could be made to Bishopston and Redland ward boundaries, a recent proposal from Bristol City Council has revealed.

SIGNIFICANT changes could be made to Bishopston and Redland ward boundaries, a recent proposal from Bristol City Council has revealed.
Reshaping current areas is part of the electoral review, which aims to balance the number of citizens each city councillor represents.
Noticeable amendments to Bishopston and Redland ward include St Andrews Park becoming a part of Ashley and Stokes Croft, and Gloucester Road being split between three wards, rather than two.
Redland's boundary would encompass Redland station - currently included in Cotham - and the ward would go up as far as Bishop Road - currently included in Bishopston.
Bristol would be retaining its 70 councillors, however some wards would be only represented by one councillor, including Westbury-on-Trym and others by three, including Ashley and Stokes Croft.
Members of the public are being encouraged to have their say on the proposed changes, drafted by the independent Local Government Boundary Commission for England (LGBCE).
According to Redland councillor Martin Fodor, a number of issues were raised at a recent forum, where residents were informed of the new boundaries.
He said: "While Redland ward would in future include Redland station, it would also include a lot more of Bishopston.
"All of St Andrews would be in the proposed Ashley and Stokes Croft ward, with the area east of Gloucester Road and Stokes Croft represented by a new three member ward.
"Everyone is encouraged to look at the proposals and consider how they reflect local community interests and the management of our neighbourhoods and high streets."
Yvonne Dawes, democratic and statutory services manager said: “The Boundary Commission is aiming to make sure the electorate are best-served by the right number of local councillors proportionate to the number of people they serve, and that wards accurately reflect where communities are located in what is a very important move for the city.
“Different areas of Bristol enjoy unique and special characteristics and it is very important that all feedback is shared with the Boundary Commission before any changes are introduced.”
Full recommendations and an interactive map are available at: www.consultation.lgbce.org.uk and www.lgbce.org.uk. The public consultation will run until February 15.