Extended delivery hours cause concern

January 30 2014

CAMPAIGNERS have been outraged by a recent application submitted by Sainsbury's to extend delivery hours at the Memorial Ground - before it has even bought the site in Horfield for development.

CAMPAIGNERS have been outraged by a recent application submitted by Sainsbury's to extend delivery hours at the Memorial Ground - before it has even bought the site in Horfield for development.
The chain was granted permission a year ago for a supermarket but the deal with Bristol Rovers has been delayed for a judicial review.
Now Sainsbury's wants Bristol City Council to allow supermarket lorries to deliver stock between 5am and midnight, seven days a week, which will add an extra 20 hours of delivery time each week.
Sixty-seven objections have already been lodged, with opponents saying it would mean neighbours would have a limited amount of undisturbed sleep.
Sainsbury's currently has consent from the council to deliver goods between 6am and 11pm, Monday to Saturday, and 9am and 8pm on Sundays and bank holidays. 
Rovers wants to sell the Memorial Ground to Sainsbury's so the club can go ahead with its plans for a new 20,000-seater stadium at Frenchay.
Councillor Daniella Radice, who is a part of the anti-supermarket campaign group TRASH, said: "It is incredible that Sainsbury’s are applying to extend their delivery hours given the sensitivity of the application.
"Their delivery yard is in close proximity to many houses and by extending the hours neighbours will only have five hours of undisturbed time per night."
She added: "If the store is not operationally viable without a time extension it adds to the argument about this being an unsuitable location for such a large store. We have urged the council to reject this application."
The application, submitted alongside a noise assessment, was received by the council on November 27. The noise assessment report concludes that the proposed extension of hours is "not expected to have an adverse impact on health or quality of life".
Sainsbury's says that it will take measures to ensure that little disruption is caused to neighbours, including radios and headlights to be switched off in the service yard and refrigeration units and reversing alarms to be switched off between 5am and 6am, and 11pm and midnight.
Ben Littman, Sainsbury’s regional development manager, said: "There are a number of advantages in [extending our permitted deliveries hours], in particular it will help reduce the number of vehicles during peak traffic times.
"I do realise this has caused some local concern and would like to reassure neighbours that this is not unusual and that Sainsbury’s are very experienced at delivering in residential areas at these times without causing unnecessary disruption."