Celebrating Bristol’s green spaces

August 28 2015

ST Andrews Park and Horfield Common are two of the 200 parks featured on a new app, aimed at promoting and celebrating Bristol’s green spaces.

ST Andrews Park and Horfield Common are two of the 200 parks featured on a new app, aimed at promoting and celebrating Bristol’s green spaces.

The project is spearheaded by David Smith, a senior technical instructor at the University of the West of England (UWE), and Sam Thomson, chair of Friends of Horfield Common, and came about in response to the changes in local authority funding for parks and green spaces.

The free app is the focal point of the new Bristol Parkhive initiative – set up as part of Bristol being awarded European Green Capital – which aims to build skills of park volunteers, link university students with community groups, and highlight the importance of parks in the city.

David, who has worked on GPS enabled walks in Victoria Park, Bedminster, says that since working on the app, he has discovered green spaces he never knew about – despite living in Bristol all of his life.

David added: “While many visitors to Bristol are familiar with the large green spaces, including the Downs, the app is much about the small green spaces.

“We’re hoping that with the app, people visiting, or living in, Bristol will discover a green space they never knew about before.”

Users of the app – which is created by the award-winning Calvium – can enjoy the interactive directory, while discovering local walking routes, park features, wildlife and much more.

The app, funded by UWE, also provides links to each parks group and information on how residents can create their own group.

David says that the response so far has been “very positive”, and there have been lots of people downloading the app.

“We really want this project to be sustainable beyond Green Capital. The more people we can get engaging with our app, and website, the better.”

The Parkhive app is free to download from Google Play and the iTunes App Store.

For more information about Parkhive, and its other projects – including a digital archive, which allows people to post photos of their local park space – visit: www.bristolparkhive.com.

Horfield Common