Badminton School’s Brain Project 2016

November 01 2016

Badminton School hosted two visiting speakers recently for their series of ‘Brain Project’ talks. Professor Steve Chinn and Professor John Stein presented their latest research on ‘learning and the brain’ with particular reference to Neurodiversity, Dyslexia and Dyscalculia.

brain project

Badminton School hosted two visiting speakers recently for their series of ‘Brain Project’ talks. Professor Steve Chinn and Professor John Stein presented their latest research on ‘learning and the brain’ with particular reference to Neurodiversity, Dyslexia and Dyscalculia. Both events were well attended by a large audience of parents and professionals from local Bristol schools and colleges. 

Professor Chinn’s research enlightened the audience about why some children fail to learn maths and supported the theory that maths anxiety is real. His survey of 1,000 teachers from across the globe suggests that too many children are giving up on maths as early as the age of seven. Professor John Stein’s research focuses on the role of visual motion sensitivity in the control of movement and behaviour, particularly in students with dyslexia. 

Mrs Tear, Headmistress, commented: “At Badminton our passion is to deliver a holistic, diverse curriculum that plays to all our girls’ strengths, preparing them for the real world. As educators, we seek to inspire not only the girls in our care but the wider, global community. With this aspiration in mind, our Learning Support Team invited eminent scientists and researchers to Badminton to share their views on ‘learning and the brain’.”

The aim of ‘The Brain Project’ is to help challenge educators ideas about teaching, achieve more from the learning process and instigate a learning community with schools in the area. Understanding neurodiversity is key to helping all learners, particularly those with specific differences such as Dyslexia and Dyscalculia. Recent developments in neurology and neuroscience have helped teachers to understand and develop effective strategies. 

“As Head of Learning Support at Badminton, I follow this research with great interest and when strategies can be shared and discussed with parents and other professionals, I am convinced life chances for learners can be improved as a result,” said Deborah Redding.