Bringing invisible atoms to life through dance

November 08 2013

A REVOLUTIONARY way to learn about nanoscience through dance has been pioneered by teenagers from Fairfield High School in Horfield.

A REVOLUTIONARY way to learn about nanoscience through dance has been pioneered by teenagers from Fairfield High School in Horfield.

The youngsters were working with scientist Dr David Glowacki and digital dance group Hidden Fields on a project which was showcased last month called danceroom Spectroscopy Festival.

The show was held at Brunel's Old Station in Bristol from 24 - 26 October, before leaving the UK for an international tour. Open to the public on the Saturday, visitors were able to access scientific ideas through the power of art, movement, dance and sound.

David Glowacki, who was recently appointed a Royal Society Research Fellow at the University of Bristol, has been developing new ways to visualise the invisible atoms that make up everything around us since he became a resident at Watershed's Pervasive Media Studio three years ago.

He has devised danceroom Spectroscopy by combining molecular physics, cutting edge technology, sounds and dance choreography to build a 21-metre 360° visual projection. The installation shifts and changes as visitors play with their own movements and energy forces.  School pupils bring invisible atoms to life through dance

The Year 9 students from Fairfield, aged 13 and 14, were given the chance to experience the show after hearing a talk from Dr Glowacki, and took part in a workshop with Hidden Fields choreographer Laura Kriefman.

This will inform the work they are doing to help create resources which enable other students in their age group to understand how scientists think molecules behave.

Claire Greenwood, from Fairfield High School, said: "We have been working with David to develop his genius mechanism for creating an immersive and interactive way to understand atoms and molecules, and how his ideas can be adapted specifically for Year 9 science pupils. It’s not always easy to engage children with physics, but danceroom Spectroscopy makes it a joy."

Watershed director Dick Penny, said: “Danceroom Spectroscopy is a compelling fusion of art and science. It is pushing the boundaries of both the science and the art leading to new discoveries.”